Max Gomez

Max Gomez was raised in the starkly beautiful terrain that surrounds Taos, New Mexico. Nothing that the average American would recognize. Tall, forested mountains give way to endless high deserts. The winds carry the whispers of the First People and the Conquistadors. Ghosts outnumber the living.

Gomez reflects the cultural richness of these ancient lands. A boy of Hispanic descent drawn at an early age to the preachings of Big Bill Broonzy, learning the music of the Mississippi Delta on a kid-size guitar. Then awakened to the art of the folk songwriter by listening to his parents’ copy of John Prine’s The Missing Years. He would become a handsome young man with a priceless old Martin guitar, baring a timeless soul with his own words and music.

By fourteen Gomez was playing “Sunday Mornin’ Coming Down” in front of a Taos crowd, and soon he was a regular at local venues the Old Blinking Light and the Hotel St. Bernard up in the ski valley.

By 2010 he was “discovered” in Austin at SXSW, and by 2012 he was in Los Angeles recording his debut, Rule the World, a collection of well-crafted and produced folk/pop gems that will stubbornly stick to your ears. Released by the prestigious New West label, this record is conclusive evidence of a real writer at work. His writing is bright and weathered, romantic and wise, maybe a touch disillusioned for a man of his age. His voice is a wonder, earnest but polished, kind of an unholy cross between Kris Kristofferson and Frank Sinatra.

He may remind you of a few fine alt-folkies from other locales, but Gomez deserves your Tex-centric attention.

Three things to know about Max Gomez (1) he spent time with songwriter Keith Sykes, who had collaborated with John Prine on The Missing Years, (2) his father hand-crafts artisanal furniture in Taos, and (3) if you’re lucky, you might catch him playing the old plaza in Santa Fe on a cool summer night.

If you love Max Gomez, Austin Songwriter suggests you check out BettySoo, Miles Zuniga and Ana Egge.

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