Mary Gauthier

Having been mentioned, with other visionaries, in Ray Wylie Hubbard’s “Name Droppin’”, Mary Gauthier has plenty of Texas cred and the life lessons to back it up. Gauthier (pronounced “go-shay”) writes dark pictures of lost love and life gone awry, and sings them deep like the brackish waters of a Louisiana bayou.

Gauthier was born in New Orleans, but had far from a normal childhood. A mother forced to surrender her newborn to an asylum, a baby girl left on the doorstep of a big world, a difficult start. A mother she would never know.

Mary was adopted a year later, but ran away at the age of fifteen to embark on a journey of self-discovery. Unfortunately, it began with the discovery of drugs and alcohol, and stops along the way included drug rehabilitation centers, halfway houses, brief stints in jail and many nights crashing on friends’ couches.

She struggled to find her feet and decided to pursue a culinary career. She would eventually own three successful restaurants, but her demons continued to haunt. Arrested for drunk driving on her way to the grand opening of her restaurant, Mary found God’s grace on the floor of a jail cell. The clouds of hopelessness and despair began to lift and, filled with newfound hope, sobriety became her new norm.

She also found music and her stunning talents as a writer and performer. Music provided truth, something starkly absent in her childhood, and truth became the elixir to start healing the old wounds.

Lyrics have a special place in Gauthier’s heart…a place of solitude and refuge from the storms of abandonment and chaos. Songwriting is an expression of her life experience, and the miles of rough roads give absolute authenticity and rich texture to her work.

Although she has never lived in Austin, you can hear a little Texas in her songs, and you can certainly hear more than a little Gauthier in the streets and bars of the city. Often compared to such incredible songwriters as Townes Van Zandt, Steve Earle and Lucinda Williams, Mary’s songs have been recorded by the likes of Jimmy Buffett, Tim McGraw, Blake Shelton, Bill Chambers, Mike Farris and Candi Staton, Amy Helm and Bettye Lavette. She also worked with Austin’s Gurf Morlix, who produced her third album, Filth & Fire.

But Gauthier’s creativity is too vast to be confined to songwriting. She has also published short stories and is working on a book about the art of songwriting.

Her story is worth sharing, and share she does, with passion and depth, and with a message that is as captivating as it is challenging. Don’t settle for anything less than absolute truth and real love.

Three things you should know about Mary Gauthier: (1) her first album, Dixie Kitchen, was named after her first restaurant which served Cajun food in Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood, (2) she wrote her first song at age thirty-five, and (3) her songs are studied as literature at Vanderbilt University.

If you love Mary Gauthier, Austin Songwriter suggests you check out Lucinda Williams, Eric Taylor and Will T. Massey.

A|S Series (September 14, 2016)

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