Lucinda Williams

It is impossible to exaggerate Lucinda Williams’ significance to the evolution of alternative country music. An early voice of independence and originality, she stormed onto the live music scene in the seventies, and might properly be called the first female member of the outlaw movement.

Born to a literary family in Louisiana, Williams landed in Austin in 1974 and developed her craft in the rich beginnings of our progressive country scene. She has since lived in Los Angeles and Nashville, but has never lost her southern sensibility and swampy drawl.

Like so many other elemental artists, Lucinda’s work embodies both courage and fear. The lyrics are often dark but also hopeful, her voice is a combination of tentative fragility and gritty resolve. She’ll have you staring out the window, remembering the twists and turns of the road behind you, and just when you least expect it she pops the clutch and accelerates into pure pulsing joy. You’ll find yourself dancing out of the shadows and into the sunlight, your heart lighter than air. Her work is so clear and clean and right, so essential to what we now call good country music, it is impossible to imagine Williams singing anything but her plaintive portraits of hope, lust and heartbreak.

Williams first recorded her savagely beautiful work in 1980, with Happy Woman Blues, released by no less than Smithsonian Folkway Records. She hasn’t slowed down since. While she has seemingly influenced every songwriter to come in her wake, her own influences are undetectable, even irrelevant. Who cares what Hemingway was thinking? Just read the damn book.

Experience “Righteously”, Williams’ inky ode to lust or “Blue”, her riff on resignation and surrender. Listen to her powerful recitation of all the simple things that make life worth living in “Sweet Old World”. A provoking take on the riddle of the cup which is “half empty or half full”.

There is no living artist that has contributed more to American songwriting. Discover this very important soul.

Three things to know about Lucinda Williams: (1) she is the daughter of noted poet and professor Miller Williams; (2) she first performed live in Mexico City; and (3) September 6th is “Lucinda Williams Day” in Santa Cruz, California.

If you love Lucinda Williams, Austin Songwriter suggests you check out Patty Griffin, Steve Earle and Eliza Gilkyson.

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