Jimmy LaFave

Jimmy LaFave, who passed away on May 21, 2017, was another Austin artist who took the building blocks of folk and country, strength, soul and an acoustic guitar, and made something all his own.

Born in Wills Point, Texas, outside of Dallas, LaFave came of age in Stillwater, Oklahoma, and his music also bears the distinct imprint of time spent on that rugged and fertile ground. Every song is a celebration, of joy, of new love or old love, of strength or justice or the just way that things should be. Work and love and what’s right. Seems pretty simple.

As a young man, LaFave helped birth the “red dirt” scene, a strongly sincere and purely Oklahoma take on progressive country. He moved to Austin in 1992, and after having devoted more than twenty years and fifteen albums to the songwriting life, his local influence had grown to where there is now such a thing as a “Jimmy LaFave song”, whether written by Jimmy or not.

LaFave’s ballads are soaring testaments to joy and hope, a dusty voice pulling you into a very big heart. His rockers are stirring soups of old style rock and roll and rockabilly, with a little gospel thrown in to heavy the load. The road was a common theme, but while many artists sing about the pain of leaving, Jimmy would much rather have celebrated the joy of arriving.

Three things you should know about Jimmy LaFave: (1) he was a disciple of the great Woody Guthrie, and was a regular contributor and performer at the annual Woody Guthrie Folk Festival in Okemah, Oklahoma, (2) he was a respected interpreter of the work of Bob Dylan, and occasionally Bruce Springsteen, and (3) he listed Oklahoman Chet Baker, a mystical genius of jazz, as an important influence.

If you love Jimmy LaFave, Austin Songwriter suggests you check out Michael Fracasso, Eliza Gilkyson and Walt Wilkins.

image_print

Tags